Setting up my infrastructure – Part 2: Automate everything

This post is the second part in the series about my pet project, and this is about automating stuff.

As I already mentioned, I want my personal project to be automated as much as it makes sense. That starts with automatic builds whenever I check in some new code, automated testing starting with unit testing, later integration testing and then, last but not least, automated UI testing and of course code coverage analysis while testing.

To be able to do the automated UI testing, I need the UI to run somewhere to test, so that will include automated deployment to one or more test environments.

I also want to automate the process of creating beta and of course release builds. If I’m going to release binary packages to the public, I also need to package them up in some sort of installer or NuGet packages. So when I start with that stuff, I’m going to automate that too.

Some of you might ask why I’m so bought in automating all that stuff and putting so much work in the backing infrastructure when this is ‘just a pet project’.

Well, there is mainly one reason: All those tasks are in fact pretty tedious, like running the whole test suite before committing, building, packaging up and deploying the project etc.

When I work on this project, I want to concentrate on the actual work, like getting things to work like I want them to work, see what I just did and not spent a lot of time on some boring and also error-prone tasks.

So I feel that every minute I spend for my infrastructure will pay for me later in the project. That is also why I’m going to chose my environment carefully and evaluate some products. More on that in my next blog post, where I want to introduce the build server and bug tracker’s in my first evaluation round. I also want to explain to you the important things that those tools need to be capable of – of course in my personal point of view and for this very pet project.

Continue with the next part, or see the other parts in this series:

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Setting up my infrastructure – Part 1: Basic tools

For my new pet project I want to use good and efficient tooling. Since I want to create a tool for me and other .NET developers and I feel at home on this platform, I’m going to use C# for the project.

I have my personal MSDN Professional subscription, and so I use Visual Studio 2012 Professional for development. I add my personal ReSharper licence for productivity and I chose Windows 8 Professional as my development OS (in a VM on my MacBook Air). Being totally in the Microsoft .NET ecosystem I’m also going to use MSBuild and MSTest.

Update: Talking about VM on my Mac, I use VMWare Fusion for that. I also have VMware Workstation running on my home server for my build server virtualization, but that will be part of another post.

For source code versionioning I chose Git. Mainly, because I feel that even if Mercurial currently has better tooling support on Windows, Git is more mainstream and tooling is becoming better. As Git clients I currently use the GitHub client and of course the official Git commandline client. I host my sources on BitBucket from Atlassian. They give you private repositories for free, and since I invited some guys I also can collaborate with 3 others if I want without the need to pay for a private shared repository.

Besides that, I of course have the usual .NET developer tools like The Regulator for working with regular expressions, LinqPad for small test thingies and DotPeek as my decompiler.

Now, besides that I need additional tooling to keep track of my tasks, so I need a bug / issue / task tracker. And I don’t want to build releases manually or do manual testing, so I will need some sort of automatic build & test tooling, which leads me to some continuous integration / build server. Chosing which tool is best here will take some time, and so I started to evaluate different solutions. More on that in a separate post.

So the toolset for my pet project is right now:

Continue with the next part, or see the other parts in this series:

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My new pet project

As already announced on twitter, this year is the year of my pet project.

I’m going to develop something and, hopefully, will be able to release it this year. I can’t tell you much about it at this stage, but the main idea is to create some developer tooling where I couldn’t find anything useful on the market up to now and of course to try out new things and stuff.

I also want to improve my personal process of development with some experiments during this project. The first will be to set up all required infrastructure I consider important for such a project.

During my efforts I want to inform you about tools and techniques I use during this experiment, so stay tuned for more.