My résumé of BASTA conference 2013

Right now I’m on the train on my journey back from BASTA 2013. Time for a small résumé.

Making it short: The BASTA conference was great. Especially of course meeting friends and colleagues you usually just see at conferences. It’s quite interesting to see some of the guys you know from other conferences like EKON or Delphi Live! that are now also here at BASTA (especially from tool vendors that have their origin in the Delphi space).

Besides my own session about JavaScript Unit Testing (here are the Slides and code samples and also a small summary (in German) published just after my talk) I also attended some other sessions. Especially the whole “Modern Business Application” track, mainly driven from our colleagues at thinktecture was very interesting.

But perhaps even more interesting were some of the boothes. Especially one of them caught my attention: Testhub (in German). I really like the idea of outsourcing your testing efforts to testing specialists. And also the price tag on this kind of crowd-testing seems very appealing. I had the opportunity to talk directly to one of the founders of Testhub, and chatted with him about requirements against testing and the whole concept seems very well thought-out.

Im a bit sad that I have to leave that early, but I have other duties that cannot I don’t want to wait. I wish all other BASTA attendees and speakers another two exciting days in Mainz. I’m looking forward to see some of them at EKON in November.

Update: Added a link to the summary article on “Windows Developer”.

I’m Speaking at EKON 17, too

Nick started the “I’m speaking at” campaign for EKON 17, and so I thought I’d team up and join him, not only on this campaign but also going to support his Unit-Testing session with some automation tips & tricks in my own CI session.

I’m giving two sessions at

EKON 17, 04. -06. November 2013 in Cologne:

Both talks will be held in German, but since I keep my slides in english you should be able to follow, and I’m also happy to explain things in english when asked to do so.

The first session is about Continuous Integration (CI), where I’m going to explain why you should do it and what tools are available and how powerful a good CI setup can be.

The second talk is an introduction into Git. I’m explaining the differences between SVN and Git, and showing you what distributed version control can do for you.

So, I’d be happy to see you at EKON in Cologne.

Oh, and if you’re still unsure about whether you should go, then just contact me. We can arrange a little discount 😉

EKON 17 Banner

And some additional info about EKON (in German):

EKON 17 – Das Konferenz-Highlight für Delphi-Entwickler

Vom 04. bis 06. November 2013 präsentiert das Entwickler Magazin in Köln die 17. Entwickler Konferenz. Die EKON ist das große jährliche Konferenz-Highlight für die Delphi-Community und bietet in diesem Jahr insgesamt 30 Sessions und 4 Workshops mit vielen nationalen und internationalen Profis der Delphi-Community – unter anderen mit Marco Cantú von Embarcadero, Bernd Ua, Ray Konopka, Nick Hodges, Cary Jensen u.v.m. Fünf Tracks stehen zur Auswahl, von Tips &Techniques, IDE & Tools, Crossplatform/ Mobile/ Web über OOP/ Fundamentals bis hin zu Datenbanken. Auch Neuigkeiten aus dem Hause Embarcadero, wie beispielsweise die iOS-Entwicklung stehen auf der Agenda. Alle Infos auf www.entwickler-konferenz.de.

Why is everyone using Disqus?

Recently I discovered that more and more Blogs I visit start to use Disqus. And I don’t understand, why.

As Tim Bray said: “Own your space on the Web, and pay for it. Extra effort, but otherwise you’re a sharecropper“.

I read it as this is not just about owning your own ‘real estate’ on the web, but also owning your content. There is a saying going through the net (I couldn’t discover the original source, but it’s quoted like hell out there): “If you’re not paying for it, you’re the product“.

What’s this Disqus thing in the first place?

Maybe the reason that I can’t understand why everyone starts to use Disqus is, that I didn’t get the Disqus concept right myself.
For me, Disqus is outsourcing the discussion part (read: comments area) from your blog (or website) to a third party. Completely. Including the user-generated content in these comments.

Disqus offers itself as an easy way to build up communities. It’s targeted at advertising, so everything you post in your comments via Disqus may will be used to target ads.

If your read through their terms and conditions, you will notice that your personal identifiable information you and third parties (like Facebook, when connecting to Disqus) pass to them may also be sold, together with any information you ‘publicly share’ via their service (read: your comments).

What’s so bad about it?

Well, you may decide for yourself if not actually owning your own content is okay for you. You may decide to share your comments on a site that uses Disqus or you may decide to NOT share your thoughts there.

But making this decision for your Blog is making this decision for all your visitors and everyone that want to comment on your posts is forced to share their comments with Disqus – or not share their thoughts with you.

The latter is the real problem with it. I won’t comment on sites using Disqus. So you won’t receive feedback from me. Okay, some people would rather say that’s a good thing ;-), but others would be pretty happy about what I have to say.

The technical debt

On several occasions I noticed that the Disqus service isn’t that reliable. I am commuting a lot. Right now I’m sitting in a train and have tethered internet connection. Mostly, Disqus doesn’t load at all for me. I can’t tell why. Especially not why it mostly happens when I’m on a tethered connection. And honestly, I don’t care.

When using Disqus for your site, you’re not only sourcing out your comments and your user’s content, but also the continuity of your service. What, if the Disqus API changes? You need to react, or lose you’re comments. What, if they decide to shut down the service? You lose your comments. Maybe you’re able to export all ‘your’ stuff previously. But then you’re on your own how to import that stuff into your own system again.

In my opinion, the price you pay with using this service is too high. You may loose participants in your discussions, you loose control over your content and you loose control over the availability of parts of your service.

Oh, wait. I forgot to mention the advantages you have from giving up your control. Erm.. Okay. Maybe someone tells me? I can’t find any.

Update: Fixed a typo. Thanks to Bob for the heads-up.